cricketmuse

a writer's journey as a reader

“Words, Words, Words” Hamlet Knew What He Was Talking About


I came across this information in one of my many literary newsletters, and couldn’t pass up the opportunity to share this profound trivia concerning some of the books I’ve read over the years.  The source is Publisher’s Weekly, with a nod to Amazon.

As an added bonus, if you click on the book title you will be rewarded with even more amazing stats.  You never know when book stats will come in handy.  I tend to either amaze or bore my students with my accrued literary triviarium (my own word–ahem: the collection of meaningless, yet seemingly important factuals, which would be a shame to delete, hence, they are kept and spouted at some random point in time) .  Click here for the entire article.

                                                                                                                Animal Farm

29,966 words (75% of books have more words)


Slaughterhouse-Five

47,192 words (64% of books have more words)


Lord of the Flies

62,481 words (51% of books have more words)

Brave New World

64,531 words (50% of books have more words)

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

70,570 words (45% of books have more words)


Mansfield Park

159, 344 words (9% of books have more words)

                                                                                                              Moby-Dick

209,117 words (4% of books have more words)

East of Eden

226,741 words (3% of books have more words)


                                                                               Middlemarch

310,593 words (2% of books have more words)

War and Peace

544,406 words (0% of books have more words)

 

So why care how many words might be found in a book?  Maybe there is no reason.  Except it might give one pause if one is looking for a measure against what has held up over time in bookdom.  I dunno.  Maybe I just like books so much that I tend to grab onto anything booksy to store in my triviarium.  I wonder how Hamlet would have appreciated this info?

Happy Pages

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